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Title

[world tour] Shim Chung (San Francisco/Vancouver -July 2011)

Date 2011-07-01 Hits 2475 Attach


 

 

l  San Francisco

Friday, July 22, 7:00 PM

Sunday, July 24, 4:00 PM

War Memorial Opera House

Tickets Now! cityboxoffice.com

$115  $105  $89  $79  $69  $40  $30

 

l  Vancouver

Friday, July 29, 7:30 PM

Saturday, July 30, 7:30 PM

The Centre in Vancouver for Performing Arts

Tickets Now! Ticketmaster.ca

$85  $65  $45

 

Ticket Pick up location

JoEun Education Consulting

#527-510 West Hastings Street
Vancouver, B.C V6B 1L8 Canada
T: 604 637 7925  | F: 604 637 7940 | E-mail: 
joeunedu@gmail.com

 

Age Limit: Children less than 6 years old will not be admitted

 

         [Leading Roles]

 

City

Date

Shim Chung

Captain

(Act1)

Dragon King

(Act2)

Korean King

(Act3)

San

Francisco

July 22

Hyemin

Hwang

Hyonjun

Rhee

Yu Zheng

Jaeyoung

Ohm

July 24

Yena

Kang

Heonjae

Jin

Seunghyun

Lee

Hyonjun

Rhee

Vancouver

July 29

Hyemin

Hwang

Hyonjun

Rhee

Yu Zheng

Jaeyoung

Ohm

July 30

Seohye

Han

Heonjae

Jin

Hyonjun

Rhee

Jaeyoung

Ohm

 

 

 

Presented in Ten Countries in the World

 

. . the storytelling and pageantry of Shim Chung  were impressive, and clearly touched the hearts of audience members in a time when the essential humanity of dance seems largely lost.   Jennifer Dunning, The New York Times

 

Libretto: Yongku Park

Music: Kevin Barber Pickard

Choreography : Adrienne Dellas 

Costume Design: Sylvia Taalsohn (Act 1),

                                  Oleg Vinogradov (Act 2), Hangyul Oh (Act 3)

Set Design: Myungho Kim, Yonghan Hong

Lighting Design: Kyungwon Seo

Running Time: 2 hours 15 minutes (including two 15 min. intermissions)

Premiere: Sept. 21, 1986 | The National Theater of Korea

                    The best ballet work at the 1986 Asian Games Culture and Arts Festival

4 scenes and 3 acts

 

 

 

Universal Ballets Original Production on the road again

Shim Chung, a modern day classical masterpiece created for Universal Ballet has been staged more than 200 times at home and abroad and has sparked interest in many hearts in many places. As major newspapers around the world have praised its success, Shim Chung enjoys a growing endorsement from prestigious theaters the world over.

 

 

Shim Chung, a pillar of Universal Ballets repertory for more than 20 years 

Choreographer Adrienne Dellas and composer Kevin Barber Pickard teamed up to infuse traditional elegance into this classic ballet work. In preparation, they studied the history of Korea and took care in combining Korean cultural history with western classical ballet forms. This resulted in the creation of Shim Chung, a new level of performance blending traditional sentiment and modern artistry into one. The main story line is about Shim Chungs devotion to her blind father and how heaven is moved to restore his eyesight. In Korea, where family values are a deep and integral part of the culture, this kind of dedication to serve ones parents is referred to as Hyodo, and is considered a great virtue. The ballet Shim Chung, faithfully following the original story, accentuates the traditional virtue of filial piety in refined neoclassic

 

 

Updated with underwater video scenes

In 2010, Shim Chung was further developed with the addition of underwater video scenes.  For theaters with sufficient technical facilities, this upgraded version of the production will offer an extra treat to the dance audience.

 

 

Unforgettable Highlights

* The Sea Dragon Kings fury turns the sea into a whirlpool of storm.

* The strength and vigor of the sailors dances, matching the energy of the men in Spartacus, a Russian spectacle ballet.

* Shim Chung Pas de Deux with the Sea Prince – as memorable as Odette with Siegfried.

* The fantasy undersea kingdom in Act 2 is a visual feast.

* The company dances in the Korean Court in Act 3 present traditional Korean dances

with a new makeover.

Shim Chung is performed by Universal Ballets world-class artists, who have been earnestly praised by the New York Times and the LA Times

 

* Presented as a special production during the 1988 Seoul Olympics Culture and Arts Festival

* Selected as the best ballet work at the 1986 Asian Games Culture and Arts Festival

* Received critical and public acclaim at Lincoln Center in New York, The Kennedy Center in Washington D.C., and the Music Center in Los Angeles in 2001

 

 

[Synopsis]

 

Learning that an offering to the temple will allow her father to regain his sight, Shim Chung accepts a bag of gold coins from a Sea Captain, willingly agreeing to be thrown overboard to protect the captains ship from the furies of the Sea Dragon King.

After the ships captain takes her to the ship, a storm arises, and Shim Chung, offering a ritual dance and prayer, plunges into the sea to save the ship.

Under the sea, Shim Chung is welcomed warmly by the Sea Dragon King, who asks her to marry him and share his kingdom, but Shim Chung is longing to see her father, and pleads with the king to send her back.

  

Arriving back in her homeland, she finds favor with the Korean King, who marries her, but still happiness eludes her until she finds her blind father. Embracing her father, Shim Chungs tears of joy fall on his face, and he miraculously regains

his sight. 

  

 

[Reviews]

 

= Jennifer Dunning  | The New York Times | Aug. 4, 2001 =

"The storytelling and pageantry of "Shim Chung" were impressive, and clearly touched the hearts of audience members in a time when the essential humanity of dance seems largely lost"

= Lewis Segal | Los Angeles Times | July 27, 2001 =

"Evoking a Romantic Fantasy. Adding immeasurably to the splendor of the ballet: an array of costumes depicting the workaday, royal, dream and undersea worlds .

 

= George Jackson | Washington Post | April 13, 1998 =

 The women aim for lyricism and extended linearity, and the men for heroic strength.  It is unusual to see a male corps with such cohesion and cushioned power . . .

 

= Diane Baker | Taipei Times | April 11, 2011 =

 The sets were a visual feast: beautifully detailed backdrops of a village setting in Act 1 and royal court garden in Act 2, while the eye-popping underwater kingdom of the Sea Dragon king in Act 3 was magnificent, as were the brilliantly colored sea creature costumes. And the video projections used to create the raging sea during the storm scene were so effective you could almost smell the salt water.

 

 

 

 

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